Major

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The Major Program

The Managerial Economics (Bachelor of Science) undergraduate major at UC Davis is a disciplinary program combining strong preparation in microeconomic theory and quantitative methods. It prepares students for the analysis of management and policy issues in business, finance, marketing, production, agriculture, food distribution, natural resources, the environment, resource allocation, and international trade and development. Students specialize in one or more emphases selected from the following:

  • Business Economics focuses on the economic aspects of managerial decision-making essential for solving problems in business, management, marketing, and finance
  • International Business Economics explores the economic drivers and policy challenges in the major emerging markets and focuses on how these markets are impacting the world economy.
  • Environmental and Resource Economics concentrates on issues related to the use of resources and environmental quality.
  • Agribusiness Economics focuses on the economic and policy aspects of production and marketing of foods and fibers. 

Students in the Managerial Economics program develop valuable skills and strengths that lead to careers in business and government. The Managerial Economics undergraduate major is housed in the Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics


STEM Major

The University of California has reclassified the Managerial Economics BS as a Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) degree. The re-designation changes the major’s Classification of Instructional Program (CIP) code with the U.S. Department of Education’s National Center for Educational Statistics to reflect the rigor of Managerial Economics in quantitative methods for business. It brings UC Davis in line with changes made the past few years by other universities, including Columbia University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and Yale, as well as the UC Davis Department of Economics. The new STEM designation, besides making the major more competitive, may help students studying in the United States on F-1 visas.